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    Aircraft Crashes 1954, 1955, 1956

    On the rare occasion that go to an estate sale I typically look for books, history books that were printed in the 1950′s or before. I do not trust any historian of today or let’s say past the 1960′s. While there may actually be some honest historians out there I would have to read every book written by every historian to be able to determine the true historian and the activist historian.

    One of the sets I have acquired is a set of World Book Encyclopedia with Year Books thru 1976. I gain a lot of knowledge out of books like these.

    The following history can’t be manipulated and I think everything should be viewed in perspective. The air disasters of this year seem to have many in an uproar or believing accidents must be some kind of plan, a conspiracy of some sort.

    If we look to our recent past’s air disasters and compare them to those of today, you will see how much progress has been made in travel by air. Especially if you realize how many more people are flying and number of flights there are today.

    You have to read each word to get the impact of what actually happened.

    Aircraft Crashes 1954

    Jan. 7—Near Logan, Utah. Army-chartered C-46 trans­port plane crashed high in the Wasatch Mountains, on Utah-Idaho state line; 40 persons aboard killed.

    Feb. 2—North Atlantic Ocean. Four-engine British troop transport plane crashed; 39 persons aboard killed. High winds and heavy rains covered the area.

    Feb. 14—Gulf of Mexico. National Airlines DC-6 plunged into storm-tossed gulf, southeast of Mobile, Ala.; 46 persons killed.

    Mar. 20—Near Decoto, Calif. Transocean Airlines trans­port operated by U.S. Air Force crashed after receiving landing instructions; 35 aboard killed.

    May 2—Calcutta, India. British Overseas Airways Cor­poration Comet Jet airliner fell in storm; 43 persons killed.

    June 18—Near Tokyo, Japan, 129 U.S. servicemen were killed when a giant Globemaster transport plane went into a spin, nose-dived into a muddy field, and caught fire.

    July 11—Near Wake Island. Transocean Airlines DC-6B crashed, killing 58 persons.

    July 17-18—Near Milton, Fla. A Marine transport plane plunged into a clump of trees shortly after taking off from Whiting Field; 41 persons killed.

    Sep. 1—French Alps. Air France plane crashed into 10,496-foot Mount Cemet; 42 persons were killed, including French concert violinist Jacques Thibaud.

    Sep. 16—Near Albany, N.Y. American Airlines Convair hit 2 radio towers in a fog; 25 passengers and 3 crew members were killed.

    Oct. 14—Frankfurt, Germany. Belgian airliner crashed into a woods just after leaving the Rheine-Main airport; 44 persons, including 11 Americans, were killed.

    Oct. 19—Near Monterrey, Mexico. DC-3 crashed in the mountains, killing 26 persons. Plane was taking entertainers and newsmen to Falcon Dam dedication ceremonies.

    Oct. 29—Near San Francisco. British Commonwealth Pacific Airlines plane crashed on a mountainside; 19 persons were killed, including New York pianist William Kapell, who was returning from a concert tour in Australia.

    Aircraft Crashes 1955

    Jan. 10—Between Elba and Monte Cristo Islands, in Medi­terranean Sea. British Comet jet air liner exploded in mid-air and crashed into the sea; 35 persons killed.

    Feb. 1 —Off Hokkaido, Japan. A U.S. Air Force C-46 plane crashed into the sea; 35 U.S. servicemen were killed.

    Mar. 13—Singapore. A British Constellation air liner turned over and burned while landing at Kallang air­port; 33 persons aboard were killed.

    Apr. 8—Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. A Royal Canadian Air Force training plane rammed into a Trans-Canada Air Lines North Star liner; 35 persons on the North Star were killed. Also killed were the student pilot and a woman occupant of a house which the air liner hit.

    Aug. 9—Terceira Island, Azores. A Colombian air liner hit a mountain and burned; 30 persons killed.

    Aug. 15—Pakse, Laos, Indochina. A French airplane, transporting Vietnamese refugees from Hanoi, crashed into the Done River; 46 persons killed.

    Sep. 5—Dublin, Ireland. A Royal Dutch Super-Constella­tion plane crashed into the Shannon River estuary; q8 of the 56 persons aboard were killed.

    Oct. 31—Atlantic Ocean. A U.S. Navy Super-Constella­tion, en route from Patuxent River Naval Air Station (Maryland) to the Azores, disappeared; 42 persons were aboard.

    Dec. 4—Luang Prabang, Laos, Indochina. An airplane crashed into a mountainside, 26 persons were killed.

    Dec. 18—New York International Airport. An Italian Air­lines DC-6-B attempting an instrument landing in a rain crashed into a pier and fell into Jamaica Bay. Both plane and pier burst into flames, killing 26 persons.

    Dec. 25—Prestwick, Scotland. A British Overseas Airways Stratocruiser turned over and burst into flames while landing; 28 persons were killed.

    Aircraft Crashes 1956

    Feb. 13—North of Rome, Italy. A Belgian Sabena air liner disappeared during a fog, with 29 persons aboard.

    Mar. 8—North of Mascota, Mexico. A Compania Mexicana de Aviacion plane crashed and burned, killing 26 per­sons.

    Mar. 22 —Near Honolulu, Hawaii. A U.S. Navy plane crashed into Mount Heleakala during a rainstorm and burst into flames; 66 persons were killed.

    July 17—Midway Airport, Chicago. A Braniff Airways plane ran into a patch of fog and crashed; 22 persons were killed and 22 injured,

    July 7T Near Petrich, Bulgaria. An Israeli Constellation plane was shot down by Bulgarian antiaircraft gun­ners, killing 58 persons.

    Aug. 4 Near Newburg, Mo. An American Airlines Convair plane overshot the runway while making an emer­gency landing at Fort Leonard Wood; 30 persons were killed.

    Aug. 11—Near Edelweiler, West Germany. Two U.S. Air Force planes collided on a training flight. All 66 servicemen aboard the planes were killed. Oct. 6 Medicine Bow Peak, Wyoming. A United Air Lines plane plowed into the mountain peak; 65 persons were killed.

    Nov. 1—Near Longmont, Colo. A United Air Lines plane exploded in flight after leaving Denver; 44 persons were killed. See also Crime.

    Nov. 18 —Near Seattle, Wash. A nonscheduled Peninsula Air Transport plane crashed and burned; 27 of the 73 persons aboard were killed.